Dr. Seuss’ Secret Art Collection Finally Goes On View

Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, passed away in 1991, having written and showed over 60 children’s tales of enchanted animals in foreign lands, embarking on escapades, learning lessons, and improbably rhyming all the while. What few people knew, however, was that after dark, Seuss switched gears a little bit, changing from his storybook illustrations to what he dubbed “Midnight Paintings, ” fine artworks stimulated in secret, strictly for pleasure.

The images, rendered in the artist’s beloved legible, cartoonish style, depict Seussian planets packed with turtles, squirrels, fish and cats, each anthropomorphized and frozen in motion. In one draw, a fancy bird sips a martini while in another, a pair of squirrels play patty-cake atop a bending branch. This is Seuss’ world, detached from any singular story or narrative trajectory.

Liss Gallery
“Martini Bird.”

Throughout his life, Seuss kept his nighttime paintings hidden away at his Dr. Seuss Estate. He asked his wife Audrey to show them to the public only after he was gone. As she wrote in the preface to The Cat Behind The Hat, a coffee table book chronicling Seuss’ artwork: “I’m gratified to carry out Ted’s wishes and have these works revealed to the world.”

In an interview with Reading Rockets, Mrs. Geisel spoke of her husband’s lasting impact on people both young and old. “I just know that what he left as a legacy is the fun of learning when you don’t know you’re learning, ” she said. “I think the legacy is that he pleased children. He pleased the parents of children. And he’s here for all time.” Whether you were a Seuss-a-holic growing up, or are simply interested in find the( candidly not so) dark side of one of the most iconic children’s storytellers of all time, Seuss’ secret art stash will not frustrate.

The “Art of Dr. Seuss Exhibition, ” hosted by Liss Gallery, will be on view until July 30, 2016, at Pendulum Gallery in Vancouver, BC.

Liss Gallery
“Kid, You’ll Move Mountains.”

Liss Gallery

Liss Gallery

Liss Gallery

Liss Gallery

Liss Gallery
“Wisdom of the Orient Cat.”

Liss Gallery
“A Prayer for a Child.”

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